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Tennessee sets record for snake

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sewer Pipe Snipe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 May 2018 at 6:16pm
Off Vietnam there are a lot of sea snakes. You could actually occasionally see a pod of them from a Boat or a Helicopter. If you left them alone, they supposedly left you alone.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SaltiDawg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 May 2018 at 7:41pm
I have read WWII histories that report seeing hundreds if not thousands near the surface while the boat was transiting on the surface.  I also served with an officer that said they found a seasnake on the bridge after surfacing - Pacific Boat.



Edited by SaltiDawg - 22 May 2018 at 7:41pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dr. Stan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2018 at 6:02pm
I read something long ago about there being a lot of sea snakes in the Indian Ocean.  So, I Googled it and . . .

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Most venomous sea snakes

Sea snakes occur mainly in the warm tropical waters of the Indian Ocean and western Pacific Ocean (the Atlantic, Caribbean and Red Sea have no sea snakes), with a few species found well out into Oceania.





Edited by Dr. Stan - 23 May 2018 at 6:06pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gerry Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2018 at 10:16pm
That's a whole mess of Nope Rope right there. Aka Murder Ropes. 

A buddy of mine many years ago was working in a gravel quarry in Oregon. He was operating a frontloader in the pit, using the bucket the scrape down the walls and scoop up the gravel to dump in the sorter. He pulls the bucket down the face of the pit, like he had been all day, and it reveals a big hole in the bank, a hole filled with a mating ball of about 400 western diamondbacks, which promptly rolls out of the hole and onto the front of the loader. As he shat himself, he abandoned ship. Got in his truck and drove home, didnt even clock out with the foreman. That's probably why they fired him, but he was done with that job in those few milliseconds it took to realize what that big, squirming, smelly ball of death was.

Again, I get that snakes fill an important niche in the ecological Great Wheel, yadda yadda yadda. A mating ball of rattlers requires a nuclear strike from low orbit. It's the only way to be sure.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dr. Stan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 May 2018 at 1:26pm
Originally posted by gerry gerry wrote:

 A mating ball of rattlers requires a nuclear strike from low orbit. It's the only way to be sure.


Nuclear strike, aye!  LOL

When I lived in Florida I heard a story from a local about a man who fell in the Withlacoochee River somewhere in the vicinity of Dunnellon.  Apparently he fell in the middle of a glob of cottonmouths and when his body was fished from the water he was covered with hundreds of bite marks.  I grant you that the story may have been somewhat embellished, but, what a horrible way to go. 





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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote scrivener Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 May 2018 at 5:10pm

Gerry, I fully understand why your friend abandoned ship and skedaddled. I think that he showed great courage in interrupting his flight long enough to get in his truck. Had it been me, I would have abandoned the truck and just kept on running. In point of fact, I too have abandoned ship in similar circumstances.

The incident occurred 64 years ago, and it was so traumatic that even now, a lifetime later, I tremble just thinking about it. I was 7 years old, and it was the first day of summer vacation. I had just escaped the clutches of Mrs. Morgan, my second grade teacher, who against her better judgment had advanced me into the third grade. That fact amazed me and utterly astonished my parents. In fact, at first they refused to believe it. But, once they had cross-examined me and conducted their own independent investigation, they reluctantly concluded that I had not counterfeited my report card and that, indeed, I probably was going into the third grade. They still had certain reservations, though, and were not bashful about voicing them: "He passed?" "Maybe it’s a trick, or at the very least a mistake!"

At any rate, their befuddlement worked to my advantage, or at least so I thought at the time. Due to the confusion, my father, who was home for his noon meal, completely forgot to give me a list of chores to be completed that afternoon. We lived on a small Iowa farm, and there were always chores to be done, but not, apparently, that afternoon.

So, after my father went back to work I was free as a lark. I gleefully decided to spend the afternoon fishing in the Nodaway River, which abutted our land. There was a dirt road that ran about a quarter mile to the river. I hopped on my bike and started peddling down the road. This was not without some trepidation, though. I hate snakes. The particular species is unimportant. I hate all snakes, and I am embarrassed to confess that I am deadly afraid of them.

Previously, I had been told to watch out for Blue Racers, which could be anywhere, and which supposedly could crawl as fast as a man could run. And, I had been warned about Water Moccasins, which lived in the water.

I knew, as a peddled along, that I would have to watch out for Water Moccasins when I got down to the river. I also knew that a Blue Racer could attack at any time before I reached the river, so I was constantly looking to my left and my right as I peddled along, in order to guard against a surprise Blue Racer flank attack. What I wasn’t doing very well, though, was watching where I was going.  

After checking my flanks for the umpteenth time and satisfying myself that no attack was looming, I happened to glance ahead of me and noticed something very unusual. There appeared to be a large-diameter hose stretched across the road. "That’s weird", I thought. I peddled a little closer when, inexplicably, the hose moved. I instantly realized "That no hose. THAT’S A SNAKE!"

There was no way that I was going to take the time to turn the bike around. So, I dumped it on its side and, abandoning it to the snake, I boogied for home. I ran so fast that even a Blue Racer couldn’t have caught me, even had one been so inclined.

Later, when queried, I fessed up to my parents about what had happened. My father drove his pickup down to the bike and discovered that the cause of my panic was just a harmless Bull Snake. Fortunately, my father brought the bike back to me, as I had announced, in no uncertain terms, "I’m NOT going back down there!"

My father never let me forget the incident. For the remainder of his life he occasionally would get a bemused look on his face, chuckle, and ask "Do you remember when that old Bull Snake scared you off your bike?  Of course I remembered, even though I had tried to forget the whole ugly episode. 

You know what? If I were to bike down to the river today, I wouldn’t be any braver than I was those many years ago. I would still fear flank attacks by Blue Racers; I would watch out for Water Moccasins; I especially would look at the road ahead to see if it was blocked by a Bull snake, harmless or not; and I would abandon my bicycle at the first sign of any of those evil creatures.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dr. Stan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 May 2018 at 1:46pm
Excellent story, George.  I was raised in rural central Illinois and we were told the blue racer would chase you but was harmless . . . as if any snake is harmless.  But, we were told to watch for the dreaded "black" racer.  I looked it up and the black racer is a first cousin to the blue racer and neither of them is venomous.  I would guess that the warning was given because of the similarity of the black racer to the cotton mouth (water moccasin).  One certainly would not want to get the two confused.


Blue Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus)



Coluber constrictor foxii, commonly known as the blue racer, is a subspecies of Coluber constrictor, a species of nonvenomous, colubrid snakes commonly referred to as the eastern racers.


Black Racer (Coluber constrictor foxii)



The Black Racer snake, known as Coluber constrictor priapus, is one of the most common types of nonvenomous snakes in the southern United States.








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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mpullen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 May 2018 at 6:15pm
Originally posted by Dr. Stan Dr. Stan wrote:

Well, you're right.   Those were idiots.  

At any rate, I should have said there are only 4 species of snakes "native to" N. America.  They are the rattlesnake, cottonmouth, copperhead and coral snakes. 

 
There is also the Lyre snake, found in the Arizona area. It's a rear fanged snake, so no threat to larger critters.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gerry Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 May 2018 at 7:34pm
George, your username is well deserved; your writing was very well designed and humorous. Reminded me of my favorite humor writer of all time, Patrick F. McManus. Bravo!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote scrivener Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 May 2018 at 11:37am
Thanks Stan and Gerry. 
 
Patrick McManus is also my favorite humor writer.  I've read everything he has written several times over.  I first discovered him many years ago when I was working in Dutch Harbor.  My back went out, and there was no hospital or doctor on the island.  The only thing I could do was take to my bed and read.  It was pretty boring until a co-worker brought me several copies of McManus.  It didn't take long for me to get hooked.  The only problem was that when I laughed at his humor it would jar my back,  and that was painful.  But, I couldn't stop reading. He's that good.
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